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Retirement Portfolio Net Worth – As of Oct 3- 2017

The goal is a retirement portfolio net worth of $1,000,000 and an annual passive income of $40,000. We are currently mortgage free but won’t be including the value of our principal residence or cottage as we have no plans to sell either. We have also omitted the value of our workplace defined benefit pension plans and RESPs

ASSETS:
Sept Contributions: $0
Retirement Portfolio: $472,430 (up $15,788 - stock market gains)
Rental Property: $105,000 (lowest estimated selling price)

Total Retirement Assets: $577,430 (up $15,788)

LIABILITIES:
Investment Loan: $34,134 (down $1,391)
Rental Property Loan: $77,618 (down $500)
Total Liabilities: $111,752 (down $1,891)

Retirement Portfolio Net Worth: $465,678 $447,999 (up $17,679)

Dividends Received (year to date): $10,276 (up $1464)

Well this month was a good month primarily because of the overall rise in the markets.  However, I anticipate that October, November and December will be the best months of 2017 for us. This is due to a number of factors…

Retirement Portfolio Net Worth – As of Sept 4 - 2017

The goal is a retirement portfolio net worth of $1,000,000 and an annual passive income of $40,000. We are currently mortgage free but won’t be including the value of our principal residence or cottage as we have no plans to sell either. We have also omitted the value of our workplace defined benefit pension plans and RESPs.

ASSETS:
Aug Contributions: $0
Retirement Portfolio: $456,642 (down $3,845 - stock market and currency losses)
Rental Property: $105,000 (up $25,000 estimate of post renovation selling price)

Total Retirement Assets: $561,642 (up $21,155)

LIABILITIES:
Investment Loan: $35,525 (down $1,288)
Rental Property Loan: $78,118 (down $508)
Total Liabilities: $113,643 (down $1,796)

Retirement Portfolio Net Worth: $447,999 (up $22,951)

Dividends Received (year to date): $8,812 (up $618)

We didn’t make any new contributions this month and our investment portfolio was down around 0.8%. A large portion of this decline was due to exchange rates.

I’ve finally finished the renovation…

Retirement Portfolio Net Worth – As of Aug 4 - 2017

The goal is a retirement portfolio net worth of $1,000,000 and an annual passive income of $40,000. We are currently mortgage free but won’t be including the value of our principal residence or cottage as we have no plans to sell either. We have also omitted the value of our workplace defined benefit pension plans and RESPs.

ASSETS:
July Contributions: $0
Retirement Portfolio: $460,487 (down $5,433 - stock market and currency losses)
Rental Property: $80,000 (purchase price)

Total Retirement Assets: $540,487 (down $5,433)

LIABILITIES:
Investment Loan: $36,813 (down $1,984)
Rental Property Loan: $78,626 (down $652)
Total Liabilities: $115,439 (down $2,636)

Retirement Portfolio Net Worth: $425,048 (down $2797)

Dividends Received (year to date): $8,194 (up $1,481)

We didn’t make any new contributions this month and our investment portfolio was down another 1%. A large portion of this 1% decline was due to exchange rates. The only change to the portfolio in July was that I initiated a posi…

Recent Purchase - CVS

Well I haven't been a very active buyer this year but I did just recently pull the trigger on CVS Health Corporation. I don't think this is going to be a home run but will fit in nicely as one of my core holdings that I intend to hold indefinitely.  I'm projecting an annual return in the 7 to 10% range.

Here's some of the relevant financial metrics as well as some of my rational for buying.

-Dividend Yield: 2.6%
-Payout Ratio: 36.5%
-Current Ratio: 1.1x
-PE: 16
-2017 Forard PE: 13
-Annual Dividend Growth Rate over the last 10 years: 27.1%
-Demographic tailwind, we're getting older as a country.
-Has been negative affected by the political uncertainty regarding health care in the US. Like all things I believe this uncertainty will pass and when it does the stock will rise.

ABOUT CVS
"CVS Health Corporation, together with its subsidiaries, is an integrated pharmacy healthcare company. The Company provides pharmacy care for the senior community through Omnicare, I…

Retirement Portfolio Net Worth – As of July 4 - 2017

The goal is a retirement portfolio net worth of $1,000,000 and an annual passive income of $40,000. We are currently mortgage free but won’t be including the value of our principal residence or cottage as we have no plans to sell either. We have also omitted the value of our workplace defined benefit pension plans and RESPs.

ASSETS:
June Contributions: $0
Retirement Portfolio: $465,920 (down $2,264 - stock market losses)
Rental Property: $80,000 (purchase price)

Total Retirement Assets: $545,920 (down $2,264)

LIABILITIES:
Investment Loan: $38,797 (down $677)
Rental Property Loan: $79,278 (down $496)
Total Liabilities: $118,075 (down $1173)

Retirement Portfolio Net Worth: $427,845 (down $991)

Dividends Received (year to date): $6,713 (up $1,682)

We didn’t make any new contributions this month and our investment portfolio was down another 0.5%. Normally, I would be pouring more money into the markets but this year I’ve been keeping a lot of it in our savings account because my wife will b…

Rental Properties – What I’ve Learned So Far

As you know I’ve recently bought a single family rental unit that required a TON of work. Well I’m currently in the process of jazzing it up and everything is going according to both the plan and budget. I thought it might be valuable to share what I’ve learned so far about the income property buying process.

Basically, other than the buyer and seller there are 4 parties involved in the transaction. The real estate agents, banks, lawyers and insurance. The first 3 were a breeze and I’d go as far as say they were a pleasure to deal with. However, INSURANCE and insurance brokers/underwriters/sales people have to be the biggest pain in the ass.  I found the whole insurance procurement process excruciating painful. I’m generally a reasonable guy but multiple times when dealing with insurance industry “professionals” I’ve had to put the phone down, take a few deep breaths and call on my inner zen to prevent the top of my head from exploding off it’s foundation.

Long story short I eventuall…

Learn how to Cook

Like most things in life cooking isn’t hard. In my mind there really isn’t any excuse for not being able to cook anything from scratch. Now don't get me wrong I'm not talking cooking full 5 course gourmet dinners or fancy pastries etc...However, it is easy to master the basics and cook above average meals by just following these 6 easy steps:

1. Pick your “favorite food”
2. Google  “favorite food” recipes
3. Pick a well reviewed recipe
4. Buy the ingredients.
5. Follow the recipe instructions
6. Enjoy.

I'm currently enjoying an awesome jerk chicken that we made from scratch at home. It's as good at 99% of the jerk chickens I've had in restaurants (and costs a fraction of the price.)